I mentioned that one of the things that I have been studying as of late is righteousness by faith. But it might be a good idea to start out by defining righteousness by faith or justification by faith.

The problem that we humans have with justification by faith or righteousness by faith is that is defined as this:
“It is the work of God in laying the glory of man in the dust, and doing for man that which it is not in his power to do for himself.”

The first part doesn’t appeal to many people. How many of us really want to lay our glory in the dust? Most of us if we’re honest with ourselves would like to be famous. We want our fifteen minutes of fame. We try to find or create different ways in which to do that. And society is bowing to our desire. Look at how easy it is to become famous today, all you have to do is get a viral video and bam!

“It is the work of God in laying the glory of man in the dust, and doing for man that which it is not in his power to do for himself.”

–Ellen White

Yet justification by faith is the work of God laying the glory of man and woman in the dust. God can’t work with a person full of pride thinking they can do everything on their own. The reason He can’t is because that person won’t let Him work.

Here’s the thing, God only works with people fully submitted to Him. He won’t force anyone to anything they don’t want to. And when we submit to Him we are admitting that we can’t do anything to save ourselves.

The Bible teaches that we must be righteous in order to be saved. Jesus says in Matthew 5:20, “For I tell you that unless your righteousness surpasses that of the Pharisees and the teachers of the law, you will certainly not enter the kingdom of heaven.”

If we even think that we can be more righteous than the Pharisees of old we’re mistaking ourselves. It doesn’t matter if we believe the truth, if we’re doing it for our own glory, we’re lost. Righteousness by faith means we submit to Christ, admitting that we can’t save ourselves and that we can’t be righteous in and of ourself. Then and only then does Christ give us His righteousness.

As Jeremiah said, “And this is His name by which He will be called, ‘The LORD our righteousness.'” It is Christ’s righteousness, not ours.

The next post in this series will deal with how we become righteous. (Click Here)